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Title page || Staff

Head of JUSTIN

David Kosař

David Kosař

David Kosař earned his M.A. in Law at Masaryk University, LL.M. in Human Rights Law at Central European University, and J.S.D. at New York University School of Law. He clerked for a Justice and then the Vice-President of the Supreme Administrative Court, and for a Justice of the Constitutional Court of the Czech Republic. In 2016 he was awarded the ERC Starting Grant to study the effects of judicial self-government (“JUDI-ARCH – The Rise of Judicial Self-Government:Changing the Architecture of Separation of Powers without an Architect”, 2016-2021). He is the author of “Perils of Judicial Self-Government in Transitional Societies” (CUP, 2016). David has published in American Journal of International Law, European Journal of International Law, International Journal of Constitutional Law, European Constitutional Law Review, Hague Journal of the Rule of Law, German Law Journal, and International Journal of Refugee Law. He is a member of several learned societies (ASIL, ESIL, LSA, ICON-S, ECPR) and the inaugural co-chair of ICON-S CEE Chapter (2018-2021). David’s research interests include constitutional theory, comparative public law, judicial studies, international human rights law, refugee law, and transitional justice.

Senior Researchers

Simone Benvenuti

Simone Benvenuti

Simone Benvenuti earned his M.A. in Political Science and PhD in Theory of the State and Comparative Political institutions under the supervision of Professor Fulco Lanchester, at University “La Sapienza” in Rome, where he also worked as teaching assistant in Comparative constitutional law. Between 2010 and 2011, he spent one year as CMEPIUS Research fellow at the Faculty of Law of the University of Ljubljana, where he researched on the judicial reforms in countries from former Yugoslavia under the supervision of Professor Janez Kranjc. In 2012, he was awarded the Marie Curie Fellowship to study the effects of judicial training and socialization on the development of a European judicial culture, notably in then new Member States (“EJT – European judicial training and culture”). In November 2013 he obtained the qualification as associate professor in comparative public law in Italy. He authored two books on the French and Italian judicial councils and on the role of CEECs national parliaments in the EU respectively, and published articles in Italian and international journals. Simone’s research interests include constitutional law and theory, parliamentary law, comparative political institutions and judicial studies.

Hubert Smekal

Hubert Smekal

Hubert Smekal holds a PhD in European Studies from Masaryk University, Brno, where he currently works as an assistant professor. He spent a year (2010–2011) as a Fulbright–Masaryk Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society, University of California, Berkeley. He co founded the Czech Centre for Human Rights and Democratization and serves as a member of the Human Rights Council of the Czech Government. His academic interests take in the issues of human rights, the political role of the CJEU and ECtHR, and judicialization of (international) politics. Smekal has published articles in European Constitutional Law Review, Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights, and Journal of Mixed Methods Research. He has authored two books on human rights, co edited five volumes, and published a number of book chapters and articles in peer-reviewed journals.

Samuel Spáč

Samuel Spáč

Samuel Spáč earned his PhD at the Department of Political Science, Faculty of Arts at Comenius University in Bratislava (Slovakia) and his M.A. in Political science at Central European University in Budapest in 2013, where he received The Best Thesis Award for his research on judicial independence in Czech Republic and Slovakia. In 2016 he was a Visiting Post Graduate Researcher at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. From 2013 to 2016 he worked as a project coordinator and an analyst for anti-corruption NGO Transparency International Slovakia with focus on topics of judiciary, state-owned companies and local self-government. Samuel's research focuses on institutions of judicial independence, performance of judiciaries and gender issues.

Katarína Šipulová

Katarína Šipulová

Katarína Šipulová earned her PhD at the Faculty of Social Studies, Department of European Studies, Masaryk University, Brno, and the MSt title in Socio-Legal Research at the University of Oxford. Her main area of interest is transitional justice and democratization of the Central and Eastern European countries. Katarína Šipulová worked as Head of the International Department of the Czech Supreme Court. She has been an active member of several research projects dealing with human rights as well as international law and its impact on domestic jurisprudence (e.g. international human rights treaties in national legal systems, implementation of ECtHR case law against the Czech Republic). Katarína was co-leader of a project on the application of EU law by the Czech civil courts conducted by the Supreme Court in 2012.

Nino Tsereteli

Nino Tsereteli

Nino Tsereteli holds a doctorate in law from the University of Oslo, Norway, where she worked as a researcher for the PluriCourts, Centre for the Study of Legitimate Roles of the Judiciary in the Global Order (2012-2015). She also holds an LL.M. in public international law from Leiden University, the Netherlands (2008), an LL.M. in comparative constitutional law from Central European University in Budapest, Hungary (2007) and an LL.B. from Tbilisi State University. She worked for the Ministry of Justice of Georgia as a legal advisor and a Deputy Head of the Department of State Representation to International Courts (2009-2011).

Bríd Ní Ghráinne

Bríd Ní Ghráinne

Bríd Ní Ghráinne holds a DPhil from University of Oxford, an LL.M. cum laude from Universiteit Leiden, and a BCL (International) from NUI Galway. She also holds diplomas in Legal French and Legal Irish from the Law Society of Ireland, and the National University of Ireland, respectively. Bríd’s current research project is entitled “Safe Zones in International Law”, and examines the human rights, humanitarian, and refugee law frameworks pertaining to the establishment of safe zones in armed conflict. Bríd’s previous work has appeared in journals such as the International Journal of Refugee Law, Legal Studies, and the Irish Yearbook of International Law. Bríd also lectures on the topic of internal displacement at the University of London (part-time), and she is an Ad Hoc Consultant for Global Security and Disaster Management.

From 2014-2018, Bríd was a Lecturer in Forced Migration and Public International Law at the University of Sheffield. She was appointed a member of the Council of Europe Expert Working Group on Internally Displaced Persons and she has also provided consultancy services to Greenpeace and Oxford Analytica. Before commencing her doctoral studies, Bríd held research positions in the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.

Madalina Moraru

Madalina Moraru

Madalina Moraru obtained her Doctoral Degree in Law from the European University Institute (EUI) with a thesis entitled “Protecting (unrepresented) EU citizens in third countries:the intertwining roles of the EU and its Member States”. She has a magna cum laude LL.M. in European Law from Durham University, a Comparative and Public International Law LL.M from the EUI, and a law degree from the Faculty of Law, University of Bucharest.

Before joining the JUSTIN Centre she was a Research Fellow at the Centre for Judicial Cooperation of the EUI, where she won and coordinated four research and legal training grants from the European Commission. She has been invited by the European Parliament and Commission to carry out research studies on the EU citizenship right to equal protection abroad. Before joining the EUI, she worked as research assistant in the cabinet of Renate Weber, Member of the European Parliament, as legal counsellor at the Romanian National Council for Refugees. She has organised several conferences on varied EU law subjects, published articles in several journals and chapters in edited books. Her research interests include the law and policies of EU external relations, consular and diplomatic law, fundamental rights, judicial cooperation, asylum, immigration, and EU citizenship.

Ladislav Vyhnánek

Ladislav Vyhnánek

Ladislav Vyhnánek works as an Assistant Professor of Constitutional Law at the Faculty of Law, Masaryk University and as a part-time law clerk at the Czech Constitutional Court. Ladislav holds legal degrees from Masaryk University (Mgr., JUDr., Ph.D.) and NYU School of Law (LL.M.). His research interests include constitutional law and human rights with a focus on the role and functioning of constitutional courts in constitutional democracies. Ladislav's recent publications have dealt with variety of issues including judicial review of social rights regulations by constitutional courts, appointment of constitutional judges or the positions of the Czech Constitutional Court with regard to ECtHR's case-law, EU and the Czech constitutional identity.

Marína Urbániková

Marína Urbániková

Marína Urbániková earned her Ph.D. in sociology at Masaryk University in Brno (Czech Republic). Her research focuses on public confidence in judiciary and its perception by various stakeholders in the legal field, and sociology of legal profession. Marína also works as an assistant professor at the Department of Media Studies and Journalism, teaching mostly courses focused on research methodology, methods, and techniques. Her research interests include topics of journalism as a profession, journalism cultures, journalism education, media coverage of elections, objectivity, trust & confidence in media and journalists, and media representation of vulnerable social groups. Besides, she is the head of research unit at the Office of the Public Defender of Rights of the Czech Republic, where she conducts research concerning public administration and discrimination.

Researchers

Adam Blisa

Adam Blisa

Adam Blisa earned his M.A. in law at the Faculty of Law at Masaryk University in Brno, and continues there as a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Constitutional Law and Political Science. Apart from his work at the Judicial Studies Institute, he clerks for a judge of the Supreme Administrative Court of the Czech Republic.

Tereza Papoušková

Tereza Papoušková

Tereza Papoušková earned her M.A. in law at the Faculty of Law and in international relations at the Faculty of Social Studies, both at Masaryk University in Brno. Since 2015 she has been a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Constitutional Law and Political Science at the Faculty of Law at Masaryk University. She worked as a law clerk for a constitutional justice and as a member of the OPCAT National Preventive Mechanism. Her research interests include the role of lawyers before courts, constitutional courts and the issue of who is (should be) the bearer of fundamental rights.

Jan Petrov

Jan Petrov

Jan Petrov studied law, political science and international relations at Masaryk University. Since 2014, he has been a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Constitutional Law and Politics at Masaryk University Faculty of Law. In 2018, Jan earned LL.M. degree in International Legal Studies from New York University School of Law where he studied as a Hauser Global Scholar. Besides his studies, Jan worked as a law clerk at the Supreme Administrative Court of the Czech Republic. Jan‘s research interests include constitutional and international courts. More specifically, Jan has been researching on topics such as judicialization of politics, domestic judicial application of international human rights law, effectiveness of the ECtHR and questions of populism and separation of powers. His work appeared in European Constitutional Law Review, European Journal of International Law, East European Politics and Societies or Heidelberg Journal of International Law.

Project Administrator

Lukáš Hamřík

Lukáš Hamřík

Lukáš Hamřík earned his Master´s degree in European Studies at the Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University. He continues there as a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of International Relations and European Studies. In his doctoral research, Lukáš focuses on personalization of politics at the EU level.


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